An Appeal for Sanity – Part 13

Every now and then I have this surge of indignation with our stupidity: mankind’s stupidity, I mean.

How can we, human beings, be so irrational and foolish? How can our behavior be so absurd and imprudent? Why aren’t we able to come to our senses, and see the countless ways we are endangering the Earth, our home, and all life in it. What’s wrong with us?

And then I ask the same questions I’ve been asking for so long…

Why do we allow the lowest parts of ourselves, such as greed, hatred, and mindlessness to command our actions? Why do we insist in this endless pursuit of power, possessions, prestige, and privileges that has proven to be incapable of producing lasting happiness, and that keeps bringing so much suffering to the world? Why do we choose to ignore how our actions hurt others and the planet?

Why do we divide ourselves in all sorts of tribes? Why do we fight each other? Why don’t we unite, once and for all, recognizing that we are members of just one tribe, the tribe of humanity? Why do we keep wasting resources manufacturing killing devices instead of using our talent and time to improve the quality of life for all sentient beings on this planet? Why can’t we join forces to preserve, enhance, and enjoy our planet, this beautiful garden and wonderful playground that was given to us? Why can’t we understand that we are all in this together?

Isn’t our behavior completely insane?

What’s wrong with us?

Every time I reflect about this absurd state of affairs, Carl Sagan’s Pale Blue Dot exhortation comes to mind. He reflected on the size of our planet, and after bringing to our attention that the Earth is no more than a tiny dot in the immensity of the Universe, he called us to come to our senses.

 

 

“The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.” ~ Carl Sagan

Here it is, once again, my appeal for sanity: 

“We are all crew members and passengers of spaceship Earth, and we need to work together to preserve this vehicle that is taking us through the cosmos. We have to look at the big picture. We are all interconnected and interdependent. We are all in this together. We must stop all this ridiculous and pointless fighting, and cooperate unreservedly with each other, because we will either succeed and live, or fail and die, all of us together. Let’s change the focus, stop worrying about ourselves, and start thinking what we can do for others. Rather than asking, ‘What’s in it for me?’ let’s ask, ‘How can I serve?’ We are all responsible for preserving Planet Earth and building a sustainable future for all life. Let’s work together for the common good, for the greater good. And working together for common goals is completely possible. We just need to let go of fear and selfishness, and have the resolve to make it happen. So, let’s stop the nonsense and the pettiness! Heaven is here, if we want it to be.”

……..

So many people in the world have grown but not matured. They grow physically, but still act like spoiled, selfish, and insecure children. The world needs people who behave as true adults, adults who see with clarity, are guided by wisdom, and act with selflessness and responsibility for the well-being of all sentient beings.

……..


 

Piero Falci is an author and educator who believes that the inner work that leads to personal awakening and transformation is indispensable to create a wholesome world. He is an explorer of the mysteries of life who loves to observe, reflect, and write, and who not only strives to live a life that matters, but also hopes to inspire others to do the same. He is a promoter of peace who believes in advancing the idea that Heaven is here if we want it to be. He teaches mindfulness meditation, mindful living, and the acclaimed Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program as taught at the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Healthcare, and Society of the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He organizes Silent Peace Walks.


 

Take a look at these books at the Peaceful Ways online store

http://peacefulways.org/store/

Book Cover Image

– “Peaceful Ways – The Power of Making Your Wishes Come True”

Pay Attention Book Cover

– “Pay Attention! Be Alert! Discovering Your Route to Happiness”

Silent_Peace_Walk_Cover_for_Kindle

– “Silent Peace Walk”

www.PieroFalci.com

An Appeal for Sanity – Part 12

I believe astronauts should rule the world. All of those who have been beyond Earth’s atmosphere and seen it from above have been struck by our planet’s beauty and fragility, and reflected on our unreasonable and preposterous behavior. Frank Borman, one of the first three human beings to orbit the moon, said,  “When you’re finally up at the moon looking back on earth, all those differences and nationalistic traits are pretty well going to blend, and you’re going to get a concept that maybe this really is one world and why the hell can’t we live together like decent people?”

 

When asked about what he remembered from the 1968 Apollo 8 flight, Jim Lovell had this to say: “We had pictures before of the far side of the moon, so we knew what to expect. What we didn’t expect was to see the Earth as it really is. I put my thumb up to the window and could hide the Earth. Suddenly, I realized that I am 240,000 miles away, but behind my finger is a planet with about 4 billion people. That told me in a moment just exactly what we are in the universe.”

He also added, “There’s an old saying, ‘I hope to go to heaven when I die.’ Suddenly, it dawned on me that we went to heaven when we were born! We arrived on a planet that had the right amount of mass to have the gravity to contain water and an atmosphere, just at the proper distance from a star. It appeared to me that God had given mankind sort of a stage to perform on. I guess how that play will turn out is up to us.” 

Here’s my appeal for sanity:

“We are all crew members and passengers of spaceship Earth, and we need to work together to preserve this vehicle that is taking us through the cosmos. We have to look at the big picture. We are all interconnected and interdependent. We are all in this together. We must stop all this ridiculous and pointless fighting, and cooperate unreservedly with each other, because we will either succeed and live, or fail and die, all of us together. Let’s change the focus, stop worrying about ourselves, and start thinking what we can do for others. Rather than asking, ‘What’s in it for me?’ let’s ask, ‘How can I serve?’ We are all responsible for preserving Planet Earth and building a sustainable future for all life. Let’s work together for the common good, for the greater good. And working together for common goals is completely possible. We just need to let go of fear and selfishness, and have the resolve to make it happen. So, let’s stop the nonsense and the pettiness! Heaven is here, if we want it to be.”

……..

On December 24, 1968, in what was the most watched television broadcast at the time, the crew of Apollo 8 read in turn from the Book of Genesis as they orbited the Moon. Bill Anders, Jim Lovell, and Frank Borman recited Genesis chapter 1, verses 1 through 10 verbatim. Anders began by saying, “We are now approaching lunar sunrise, and for all the people back on Earth, the crew of Apollo 8 has a message that we would like to send to you.” He then read verses 1–4, Lovell read verses 5–8, and Borman read verses 9–10, concluding the transmission saying, “And from the crew of Apollo 8, we close with good night, good luck, a Merry Christmas – and God bless all of you, all of you on the good Earth.”

The preceding text is from a Wikipedia article under the title ‘Apollo 8 Genesis reading.’ I included it here because I feel that the final words pronounced by Frank Borman in that message express the feeling of inclusiveness in a very expressive way. I think his was the right message, one that includes everyone and that is worth repeating: “God bless all of you, all of you on the good Earth.”

……..

Here’s an idea: Every elected official, or better, every person running for public office in the world, as a requirement, should spend time in outer space looking at our world from above.

……..


 

Piero Falci is an author and educator who believes that the inner work that leads to personal awakening and transformation is indispensable to create a wholesome world. He is an explorer of the mysteries of life who loves to observe, reflect, and write, and who not only strives to live a life that matters, but also hopes to inspire others to do the same. He is a promoter of peace who believes in advancing the idea that Heaven is here if we want it to be. He teaches mindfulness meditation, mindful living, and the acclaimed Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program as taught at the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Healthcare, and Society of the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He organizes Silent Peace Walks.


 

Take a look at these books at the Peaceful Ways online store

http://peacefulways.org/store/

Book Cover Image

– “Peaceful Ways – The Power of Making Your Wishes Come True”

Pay Attention Book Cover

– “Pay Attention! Be Alert! Discovering Your Route to Happiness”

Silent_Peace_Walk_Cover_for_Kindle

– “Silent Peace Walk”

www.PieroFalci.com

 

 

Meditation Is Not What You Think

We don’t meditate to create any particular state or unusual experience, such as a state of calmness, or an experience of transcendence. Whenever we expect the meditation practice to produce a desirable state or experience, we are setting ourselves up to frustration. Our intention during meditation should be to remain open and observe whatever arises, without striving for anything special to happen, knowing that sometimes what arises can be quite disturbing and unsettling.

Sometimes the meditation will be easy and blissful, other times it will be difficult and tormenting, but we should be careful with our tendency to classify our meditations as good or bad. Not all pleasant meditations are good, and not all unpleasant ones are bad. A good meditation is one that gives the brain a good workout, develops focus, sharpens the ability to notice, and augments the appetite to investigate, discover, and learn.

Despite all the ups and downs we face during this journey of exploration through meditation, as long as we keep practicing, we will be moving forward, making progress, and developing our ability to live more mindfully, which is what will, in the end, improve the quality of our lives.

So, during meditation, don’t expect anything enjoyable or extraordinary to happen. If it happens, great! Enjoy it! The problem is not with the experience itself, but with the expectation and the strong impulse to control the process in order to produce certain results. The advice is, “Do not strive to produce any specific outcome. Let go and let it be. Expectation will lead to frustration. Just meditate without expectations, and trust that a regular and commited practice will bring about improvements in your life.”

By practicing regularly we will be developing this invaluable ability to more skillfully process the ups and downs in our lives — the good and the bad occurrences, the easy and the difficult situations, the pleasant and unpleasant experiences — with greater equanimity, balance, serenity, and ease. We will learn to reduce unnecessary reactivity and useless struggle, accept life as it presents itself, and use wise assessment and discernment to choose the best responses, all of them skills that are truly priceless.

……..


 

Piero Falci is an author and educator who believes that the inner work that leads to personal awakening and transformation is indispensable to create a wholesome world. He is an explorer of the mysteries of life who loves to observe, reflect, and write, and who not only strives to live a life that matters, but also hopes to inspire others to do the same. He is a promoter of peace who believes in advancing the idea that Heaven is here if we want it to be. He teaches mindfulness meditation, mindful living, and the acclaimed Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program as taught at the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Healthcare, and Society of the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He organizes Silent Peace Walks.


 

Take a look at these books at the Peaceful Ways online store

http://peacefulways.org/store/

Book Cover Image

– “Peaceful Ways – The Power of Making Your Wishes Come True”

Pay Attention Book Cover

– “Pay Attention! Be Alert! Discovering Your Route to Happiness”

Silent_Peace_Walk_Cover_for_Kindle

– “Silent Peace Walk”

www.PieroFalci.com

 

The Way Out of Suffering

In order to alleviate suffering, the first thing we have to do is to cultivate the aspiration to know reality as it is. A lot of the suffering we experience comes from wrong perceptions, from not seeing things as they really are. In order to see clearly, we need to develop the ability to pay focused attention and sharpen our noticing skills. We need to examine life and do our best to consciously unlearn the unwholesome notions that we may have unconsciously learned. We need to remove those distorting lenses that impair clear vision, such as wrong ideas and beliefs.

We need to be careful with what we think, say, and do, because unwholesome thoughts, words, and actions create suffering. We must accept without hesitation that restraint, simplicity, and frugality, combined with selflessness, compassion, and a steadfast determination to do no harm, unequivocally eases suffering in the world.

It is by curbing reactivity and expanding the time between receiving a stimulus and choosing a response — which is put into practice by making unhurried and thorough assessments of the situations, applying wise discernment, and choosing the most appropriate responses — that we trim misery down. It is by remaining awake, alert, attentive, aware, and appreciative of life in the present moment that we reduce anguish. It is through mindful living that we diminish agony and tribulation in the world.

In a nutshell, conscious living is the way out of suffering.

……..


 

Piero Falci is an author and educator who believes that the inner work that leads to personal awakening and transformation is indispensable to create a wholesome world. He is an explorer of the mysteries of life who loves to observe, reflect, and write, and who not only strives to live a life that matters, but also hopes to inspire others to do the same. He is a promoter of peace who believes in advancing the idea that Heaven is here if we want it to be. He teaches mindfulness meditation, mindful living, and the acclaimed Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program as taught at the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Healthcare, and Society of the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He organizes Silent Peace Walks.


 

Take a look at these books at the Peaceful Ways online store

http://peacefulways.org/store/

Book Cover Image

– “Peaceful Ways – The Power of Making Your Wishes Come True”

Pay Attention Book Cover

– “Pay Attention! Be Alert! Discovering Your Route to Happiness”

Silent_Peace_Walk_Cover_for_Kindle

– “Silent Peace Walk”

www.PieroFalci.com

 

Looking Deeply and Letting Go

I agree with Socrates who said that “an unexamined life is not worth living.” I believe that it’s our duty to examine life and consciously unlearn the unwholesome notions that we have unconsciously learned.

“The less you know, the more you believe,” is a saying that points to the fact that many of us hold on to unwholesome beliefs that most likely we absorbed during that time in our lives when we hadn’t yet developed the ability of critical analysis. It is unfortunate that many of us, even after reaching adulthood, still choose, perhaps out of fear, not only not to analyze our beliefs to test their veracity, but also not to explore other points of view.  It is clear that this tendency to close ourselves up to other ideas, this stubborn determination to ignore other perspectives, and this unwillingness to change, even when evidence of the inaccuracy of our positions is presented, brings about suffering not only for others, but also for our own selves. This realization alone should be enough to encourage us to look deeply and honestly within ourselves in order to let go of those beliefs that do not contribute to the betterment of life.

Enter mindfulness!

Mindfulness is a practice aimed at alleviating and eliminating suffering. It takes us to a place of deep observation of the present moment and invites us to explore. It removes the fog of delusion and ignorance and allows us to see clearly. It connects us with what is real and true and liberates us from our old and inaccurate beliefs. It develops in us the humility to recognize and calmly accept that we have been holding on to suffering-creating views. It shows us an universe of possibilities and empowers us to let go of what does not serve us anymore. It gives us freedom to change and in doing so, improve not only our own lives, but other people’s lives as well.

……..


 

Piero Falci is an author and educator who believes that the inner work that leads to personal awakening and transformation is indispensable to create a wholesome world. He is an explorer of the mysteries of life who loves to observe, reflect, and write, and who not only strives to live a life that matters, but also hopes to inspire others to do the same. He is a promoter of peace who believes in advancing the idea that Heaven is here if we want it to be. He teaches mindfulness meditation, mindful living, and the acclaimed Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program as taught at the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Healthcare, and Society of the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He organizes Silent Peace Walks.


 

Take a look at these books at the Peaceful Ways online store

http://peacefulways.org/store/

Book Cover Image

– “Peaceful Ways – The Power of Making Your Wishes Come True”

Pay Attention Book Cover

– “Pay Attention! Be Alert! Discovering Your Route to Happiness”

Silent_Peace_Walk_Cover_for_Kindle

– “Silent Peace Walk”

www.PieroFalci.com

Noticing and Exploring Whatever Arises

Mindfulness meditation is quite simple, but it’s not easy.

In the beginning of this journey of mindfulness practice, the goal is to develop the ability to concentrate attention and notice the details of what is being observed. This practice of focusing the mind is done by choosing an “object of attention” — the breath, for instance — and setting the intention to pay attention to it. A great aid to keep the focus on this object of attention is to be interested in it, investigating it with curiosity — with a so-called “beginner’s mind” — exploring the physical sensations of breathing, and discovering them anew.

Now, while one is focusing, or trying to focus on the object of attention, the mind wanders. This is common, expected, and inevitable; nothing wrong there. So, when the practitioner notices that she is lost in thoughts, she is called to congratulate herself for noticing, acknowledge what the distraction was, gently release it, and bring her attention back to the chosen object of attention. Quite simple, but not necessarily easy.

This practice sharpens our noticing skills, and develops one-pointed focused attention. It brings awareness to the non-stop internal chatter — the proliferation of distracting and mostly non-constructive thoughts — and reveals how transient and impermanent thoughts are.

Once the practitioners get a good understanding of this practice and develop the ability to retain focus for some time, they are introduced to an expanded, and more encompassing meditation. Rather than choosing beforehand one object to pay attention to, they are instructed to investigate with curiosity whatever arises and calls for attention during the meditation. This is known as choiceless awareness meditation. It is also called open awareness or open monitoring. Again, it is quite simple but not necessarily easy.

In this meditation, practitioners are initially instructed to ground themselves, noticing sensations, and becoming aware of the body in the here-now, and the body breathing. “Sit, and know you are sitting. Breathe, and know you are breathing. Breathing in, know you’re breathing in. Breathing out, know you’re breathing out.” Once they settle down and settle in — once, as we say, they bring their minds to inhabit their bodies, once mind and body are together in the present moment — they are invited to investigate with greater curiosity whatever catches their attention, such as thoughts, emotions, sounds, or body sensations. Whatever arises becomes the object to be investigated and known.

This practice can be divided in the following four phases: 1 – Settle, 2 – Open up, 3 – Explore, and 4 – Return. Here’s an explanation of each phase:

SETTLE: Rest in the awareness of your body and your body breathing. Settle down and settle in. This will be your ‘anchor,’ a safe place to return to whenever you get distracted, agitated, or lost.

OPEN UP: Once you have settled, give yourself permission to observe other experiences. Open up and remain open to whatever arises. Notice whatever becomes predominant in your field of awareness.

EXPLORE: Investigate with curiosity what is calling you, what is asking your attention. Remember that there is a difference between observing thoughts and emotions, and being lost in them. Stay as the observer (*).

RETURN: If at any moment you get confused, agitated, or lost, return with gentleness and compassion to the anchor. Reconnect with the body and the body breathing in this moment, and once you feel settled, return to your practice, opening up and exploring again.

(*) It is important to have it clear when you are observing thoughts and emotions and when you were caught, carried away, and lost in them. It is important to develop the ability to stand in the role of the observer, the one who is watching the movie that is unfolding. The following reminders may be helpful: “Observe that you are observing. Notice that you are noticing. Be mindful that you are being mindful.”

……..


 

Piero Falci is an author and educator who believes that the inner work that leads to personal awakening and transformation is indispensable to create a wholesome world. He is an explorer of the mysteries of life who loves to observe, reflect, and write, and who not only strives to live a life that matters, but also hopes to inspire others to do the same. He is a promoter of peace who believes in advancing the idea that Heaven is here if we want it to be. He teaches mindfulness meditation, mindful living, and the acclaimed Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program as taught at the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Healthcare, and Society of the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He organizes Silent Peace Walks.


 

Take a look at these books at the Peaceful Ways online store

http://peacefulways.org/store/

Book Cover Image

– “Peaceful Ways – The Power of Making Your Wishes Come True”

Pay Attention Book Cover

– “Pay Attention! Be Alert! Discovering Your Route to Happiness”

Silent_Peace_Walk_Cover_for_Kindle

– “Silent Peace Walk”

www.PieroFalci.com

 

Observing Thoughts

A man comes to a revered master and implores, “Please, help me. I am suffering immensely. I am restless. Please, pacify my mind.” The wise man replies, “Show me your mind and I will pacify it.” Unable to fulfill the request, the man leaves. After some time he returns with the same plea, “Master, please, help me. I am suffering. I am afflicted. Please, pacify my mind.” Once again the wise man commands, “Show me your mind and I will pacify it.”  The man responds,“Master, I looked for my mind everywhere, but I could not find it.” “There!” says the teacher, “It’s already pacified.”

……..

There are those times when we are thinking without realizing that we are thinking. Thoughts are running amok, but we cannot see that we are lost in thoughts. We hop on a train of thought and travel on that train for a great amount of time, and then make an immediate connection and hop on another train, without ever disembarking from those trains of thought. We go through life as if we were anesthetized and numb. Many call it “sleepwalking through life.”

Then comes a magic moment of awakening and awareness, when we catch ourselves thinking, and we engage in an exploration: “Oh, I have been thinking. What have I been thinking? Where did this thought come from? ”

Then we reflect on the moment of mindfulness:“What happened when I became aware of the thought: did it get stronger, weaker, or did it fade away? Am I able to observe the thoughts without being carried away by them?”

As we get more curious, we may ask ourselves: “And what is a thought anyway? What is this thing we call ‘thought?’  What can I say about the characteristics, elements, and qualities of a thought? Actually, not much: a thought is pretty much nothing. It’s ephemeral and lacks substance. Thoughts are just thoughts.”

And as the inquiry continues, other questions arise, such as, “Who is having these thoughts? Who is doing the thinking? Who is the thinker?” and to add even another level of complexity to the exploration, another question emerges: “And who is asking all these questions?”

As we continue with this mindfulness practice, we soon begin to free ourselves from these dictators of the mind, and we become able to ponder, “Why do I spend so much time and energy with thoughts? Thoughts are not real. Thoughts are just thoughts. They are here one moment, and they vanish. I am not my thoughts.”

And whenever we notice that we are enthralled in the drama, we can remember to say to ourselves, “It’s just a thought!”

The truth is that no matter how thoroughly we may look for the one who is doing the thinking and the one who is asking the questions, we will not be able to find anyone. There’s no one to be found. The mystery is that we know that we are knowing, but we don’t know who is knowing. The one who is knowing cannot be found.

It is a quandary, and realizing that we cannot find the mind, that we cannot find who is doing the thinking, and that we cannot find who is asking the questions, is the finding.

Not finding the mind is the finding. Not finding who is doing the thinking is the finding. Not finding who is asking the questions is the finding. Not finding is the finding.

Yes, sometimes the saying, “Life is a mystery to be lived, not an enigma to be solved” makes perfect sense.

……..

“It’s just a thought. Thoughts are not real. Thoughts are just thoughts. Thoughts think themselves. I am not my thoughts.”

……..

Perhaps you may enjoy reading the poem Who Am I When I Am Not?

……..


 

Piero Falci is an author and educator who believes that the inner work that leads to personal awakening and transformation is indispensable to create a wholesome world. He is an explorer of the mysteries of life who loves to observe, reflect, and write, and who not only strives to live a life that matters, but also hopes to inspire others to do the same. He is a promoter of peace who believes in advancing the idea that Heaven is here if we want it to be. He teaches mindfulness meditation, mindful living, and the acclaimed Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program as taught at the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Healthcare, and Society of the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He organizes Silent Peace Walks.


 

Take a look at these books at the Peaceful Ways online store

http://peacefulways.org/store/

Book Cover Image

– “Peaceful Ways – The Power of Making Your Wishes Come True”

Pay Attention Book Cover

– “Pay Attention! Be Alert! Discovering Your Route to Happiness”

Silent_Peace_Walk_Cover_for_Kindle

– “Silent Peace Walk”

www.PieroFalci.com

Accepting Reality and Alleviating Suffering

Let’s be clear: it is perfectly valid to desire things to be different than they are, but the first step to change anything is to accept ‘what is.’ The famous quote of Carl Rogers, the humanistic psychologist, speaks volumes about this. He wrote, “The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change.”

All of us experience suffering, but what generates it? A big part of the suffering we experience comes from not accepting reality as it is and desiring it to be what it is not.  We suffer when people, things, and events are not as we wish them to be, but we have to understand that we will also suffer when people, things, and events are exactly as we want them to be because sooner or later a change is going to come and they will no longer be as they are. Change is unavoidable, and our clinging to impermanent states and things — our desire for them not to change — is a sure cause of suffering.

Not only we suffer, but we continue to suffer because we wrongly believe that the way to placate our suffering is to seek pleasure. So we engage again in craving and clinging, and we end up trapped in this vicious circle, spending our lives chasing people, things, events, and situations that, we imagine, will fill that void inside ourselves.

But no pleasure, no accomplishment, no person, no thing, no event, nor any situation is capable of producing lasting satisfaction. If we could reduce the craving for what we want, and the aversion directed at what we don’t want, we surely would suffer a lot less.  We would not spend so much time judging and saying to ourselves, “I approve this. I disapprove that. I like this. I don’t like that. I want this. I don’t want that.”  We would not try to hold on so tightly to the wanted, nor engage in vain attempts of trying to push the unwanted away. We would accept reality as it presents itself, and not waste energy futilely fighting it. We would be at peace with the inexorable and perpetual change.

In this aspect, mindfulness practice is extremely helpful because it is the practice that develops in us the ability to be aware and not cling.

Once and for all, we need to internalize the idea that the beginning of the process of liberation from suffering is to make a wise assessment of reality and say to ourselves, “This is what it is, and from here I will use wise discernment to choose the best courses of action. I am aware of change and I am not clinging. I will be aware of change and I will not cling. I will remember that nothing whatsoever should be clung to as I, me, or mine.”

……..


 

Piero Falci is an author and educator who believes that the inner work that leads to personal awakening and transformation is indispensable to create a wholesome world. He is an explorer of the mysteries of life who loves to observe, reflect, and write, and who not only strives to live a life that matters, but also hopes to inspire others to do the same. He is a promoter of peace who believes in advancing the idea that Heaven is here if we want it to be. He teaches mindfulness meditation, mindful living, and the acclaimed Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program as taught at the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Healthcare, and Society of the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He organizes Silent Peace Walks.


 

Take a look at these books at the Peaceful Ways online store

http://peacefulways.org/store/

Book Cover Image

– “Peaceful Ways – The Power of Making Your Wishes Come True”

Pay Attention Book Cover

– “Pay Attention! Be Alert! Discovering Your Route to Happiness”

Silent_Peace_Walk_Cover_for_Kindle

– “Silent Peace Walk”

www.PieroFalci.com